News Epic Games Store

lashman

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Sep 5, 2018
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lashy-chan
:disapproval-blob:

How do you not communicate with the publisher of your biggest exclusive about the details of the sale?
because they probably thought that just because they have infinite money and will be paying for those "discounts" out of their own pocket - they don't have to bother with telling developers or publishers how exactly that sale would work ...
 

GhostTrick

Banned
Oct 20, 2018
38
124
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:disapproval-blob:



because they probably thought that just because they have infinite money and will be paying for those "discounts" out of their own pocket - they don't have to bother with telling developers or publishers how exactly that sale would work ...

Epic's point is to try to be a loss leader to convert publishers to go exclusive without moneyhats. But with such shitty tools, I dont see that happening.
 

Stone Ocean

Big weeb
Apr 17, 2019
200
495
63
because they probably thought that just because they have infinite money and will be paying for those "discounts" out of their own pocket - they don't have to bother with telling developers or publishers how exactly that sale would work ...
That's my take on it. They just assumed that since publishers would get the same money they would otherwise, they can just do whatever the fuck they want without telling anyone.
 

C-Dub

Someone
Dec 23, 2018
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Cardiff, Wales
www.playedthat.com
yo wait, hold up, let's be real here.

The eShop is pretty shit. It doesn't have the dubious business practices around it that the EGS has, but it's easily in the bottom tier of all storefronts I'm forced to use lol.
Yet somehow, EGS is still worse. The eShop at least has basic functionality like discovery features, charts, a wallet, games sorted by release date, an editorial team highlighting some of the good games, frequent releases, innovative features designed to increase value for customers (the game ticket thing, for example).

From a customer perspective, EGS has a bunch of tiles laid out in no particular order and mega sale event that has backfired in a way that no other game store sales event has backfired before. Ever.
 

Wildebeet

Junior Member
Dec 5, 2018
92
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I wondering what will happen to this year's NBA 2k and WWE 2k? Will they go 6 months exclusive or will the licensing agreement between 2k and the NBA/WWE will prevent that sort of thing?
The 2K thing should be interesting. I keep wondering what will happen when there's a new Civ or XCOM. What about the mods? I'd be very surprised if Epic is going to have anything like Workshop.
 

Digoman

Lurking in the Shadows
Dec 21, 2018
356
900
93
I wondering what will happen to this year's NBA 2k and WWE 2k? Will they go 6 months exclusive or will the licensing agreement between 2k and the NBA/WWE will prevent that sort of thing?
Maybe there something against exclusive deals, but I guess would also depend on the language of the contracts and what is a "platform" in this context.

Still, if Epic gives 100% of the microtransactions like they did with Ubisoft, it will very tempting for 2k on... assuming Borderlands 3 sells within their expectations.

He still always has to throw at least a little criticism of Valve/Steam ("how they are complacent and he still wants them to have competition") in every video, but the general tone has improved a lot.

Of course, this all because Epic continues to refuse to plan anything and is always just throwing money at the problem, as it allows some space for people to see the bigger issue of exclusivity deals. If it's hard to argue now even with these super obvious flaws/mistakes, imagine if Epic did spend a year or so making the EGS backend ready before starting this whole mess.
 

lashman

Dead & Forgotten
Sep 5, 2018
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Of course, this all because Epic continues to refuse to plan anything and is always just throwing money at the problem, as it allows some space for people to see the bigger issue of exclusivity deals. If it's hard to argue now even with these super obvious flaws/mistakes, imagine if Epic did spend a year or so making the EGS backend ready before starting this whole mess.
yeah ... we can only be glad they thought all problems can be solved instantly just by throwing a fucktonne of money at them
 

ISee

loves cookies
Mar 1, 2019
480
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yeah ... we can only be glad they thought all problems can be solved instantly just by throwing a fucktonne of money at them
Yeah, their push came out of the blue.
I still wonder what triggered it? Any signs that the fortnite cow is running dry? They surely could have taken another 8-12 months to invest into their client, money processing, figure things out, hire a PR company to guide them, think about a clear strategy instead of just taking games hostage.
 

lashman

Dead & Forgotten
Sep 5, 2018
10,153
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Yeah, their push came out of the blue.
I still wonder what triggered it? Any signs that the fortnite cow is running dry? They surely could have taken another 8-12 months to invest into their client, money processing, figure things out, hire a PR company to guide them, think about a clear strategy instead of just taking games hostage.
who knows ... might be that ... or it might be the fact that Tim thought that since they already have Sergey on board - and he knows everything about steam (lol) - they might as well do it right now
 

C-Dub

Someone
Dec 23, 2018
261
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Cardiff, Wales
www.playedthat.com
who knows ... might be that ... or it might be the fact that Tim thought that since they already have Sergey on board - and he knows everything about steam (lol) - they might as well do it right now
"We made a complex engine and process V-Bux transactions, so retail should be easy!"

Hubris, nothing more, nothing less. And they were so cocky they could just throw money at the problem and make a success of it that they didn't even bother to learn the tough lessons Valve, Sony, Nintendo, Microsoft, EA, Ubisoft and CDPR learned for them already.
 

Swenhir

Junior Member
Apr 18, 2019
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758
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Here's Casey Explosion's tweet thread that Jim mentioned in the video above. Hopefully I didn't miss any of the tweets.








I think we've been able to articulate the issues with the EGS just fine from the beginning. It's not our fault the press was busy trying to astroturf for Epic.

I'm not a fan of this condescending attitude, as if they suddenly noticed what we were saying all along. Maybe I'm misunderstanding but this is how it comes across, especially with the whole Gamers™ mockery.
 

Phoenix RISING

A phoenix always RISES!
Apr 23, 2019
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Checking out different forums/discussion platforms. A lot of people are using VPN or Proxy to buy stuff from cheaper regions.

Did Epic actually not expect people to VPN/Proxy themself to get cheaper games? People have done it/tried to do it on basically every PC store/client ever.
Here I am not knowing how to VPN. Isn't that the same way ppl circumvent bans too?

That might be a grey area even I won't try.
 

Digoman

Lurking in the Shadows
Dec 21, 2018
356
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They did. They thought Sergey knew that. :"""""")
Looks like Sergey Galyonkin doesn't follow his own advices.
It is kind of curious how despite hiring someone who made a living for years analyzing Steam, Epic is doing so many avoidable mistakes. Either they are not listening to him or he has no idea what he is talking about (or maybe both... ).

Indies spent years trying to shake off the perception that those 90% discounts in the first Steam sales created, and we still hear people complaining about that today. An now Epic is just starting it all over it again. Also, one would think Galyonkin is in a position to know that a $10 flat discount regardless of regional pricing was not a good idea :)
 

gabbo

MetaMember
Dec 22, 2018
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It is kind of curious how despite hiring someone who made a living for years analyzing Steam, Epic is doing so many avoidable mistakes. Either they are not listening to him or he has no idea what he is talking about (or maybe both... ).

Indies spent years trying to shake off the perception that those 90% discounts in the first Steam sales created, and we still hear people complaining about that today. An now Epic is just starting it all over it again. Also, one would think Galyonkin is in a position to know that a $10 flat discount regardless of regional pricing was not a good idea :)
I think we give him too much credit. He built a backend to analyze Steam, but he clearly wasn't learning anything from the data he collected. Into the system, out on the site/twitter with no greater critical analysis done on his part.
 

NarohDethan

Anime threads enthusiast
Apr 6, 2019
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I think we give him too much credit. He built a backend to analyze Steam, but he clearly wasn't learning anything from the data he collected. Into the system, out on the site/twitter with no greater critical analysis done on his part.
Yeah. Just because he was able to collect said information doesnt mean that he is now a Business Intelligence guy.
 

Digoman

Lurking in the Shadows
Dec 21, 2018
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i seriously doubt he cares either way

certainly seems like someone who'll say or do anything as long as it makes him money
True on both points, specially the second one considering he still doing a Patreon for SteamSpy.

Is just that, as "Director of Publishing Strategy" it was kind of his job to avoid the specific mess that happen on this sale :p

I think we give him too much credit. He built a backend to analyze Steam, but he clearly wasn't learning anything from the data he collected. Into the system, out on the site/twitter with no greater critical analysis done on his part.
That is the thing. Is not that his past analysis was brilliant, but some of it made sense like devaluation of indies, or the fact that converting the userbase of F2P games to buying customers for other games isn't easy. It is just that Epic doesn't appear to be using any of it.

But I'm not complaining. As I wrote before, for whatever reason Epic is using just brute force with money instead of actually trying smart strategies, so it makes at least a bit easier to argue against them.
 
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Ex-User (307)

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Dec 11, 2018
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Here's Casey Explosion's tweet thread that Jim mentioned in the video above. Hopefully I didn't miss any of the tweets.








Going against the prevailing sentiment here, I think this Tweet thread actually misses the mark in a lot of ways. A lot of that is me being pedantic, but still.

The stuff about fears of devaluation and why the discounts are being pulled is absolutely spot on in my opinion. And Steam making sales opt-in is important, especially in the examples given, where a game either has just come out or is about to come out. I remember a game I wanted last Steam sale had come out of Early Access (I think it was Parkitect) right before the sale, but the developer didn't put it on sale, because they were worried about permanently devaluing their brand new game.

The rest of this thread is fairly questionable to me though. The thesis seems to partially be that "Gamers don't know how to articulate what they dislike about Epic, but really it's actually capitalism."

Which I suppose is probably true for some of us, but I really do not believe that's the issue that the overarching "angry PC gamer" has.

And the Amazon and Diapers.com example is an interesting one to bring up, because as far as I remember, consumers didn't generally care about the price war. And I've talked about this before, but the reason comes down to the differences between traditional retail (even "traditional" e-commerce/retail) and the entertainment industry.

If Amazon starts a price war with another retail front like Diapers.com, what happens to the consumer and how can they react?
  • At a very surface level, whether the discounts are ill-gotten/illegal/dubious or not, consumers see diaper prices going down.
  • The retail fronts often begin offering competing benefits or loyalty programs. In the case of the famed Diapers.com incident, Diapers.com was offering great shipping deals. So Amazon started offering special free (emphasis on free) discounts for families through a program called "Amazon Mom" that gave members two-day shipping on diapers/baby wipes, 20% off those products and occasional special discounts.
  • Note real quick that all of this was happening on Amazon's storefront, which was already popular, fairly well-designed and usable.
  • Now, was this freebie permanent? Obviously not, duh. It was largely a Trojan horse to get people into Amazon Prime, which I recall they started offering to parents for free 3-month trials at the time. It was also a way to get people into their grocery subscription services. Now the Amazon Mom benefits still exist, but they've been rolled into both Amazon Prime and give subscription requirements (i.e., you have to be part of Amazon Prime and have 5 baby product subscriptions to get the discounts).
  • For many people though, given that there are supposedly 100 million people in the USA alone with access to Amazon Prime, that still might be a worthwhile deal. You buy a monthly subscription for diapers, baby wipes, toilet paper, detergent, and one type of baby food, and boom you're qualified for the 15-20% discount, in addition to your other (seemingly) customer-friendly Amazon Prime benefits.
And here's the absolute kicker: If I don't want to buy my diapers from Amazon after they bullied Diapers.com, I can probably buy them from a dozen other places. In the USA, there are eight national supermarket chains (including Costco, Walmart, Target, Kroger owned stores, Ahold Delhaize, and Albertsons), as well as any number of local chains like Mitsuwa, Hy-Vee, Raley's, etc, and any local family small businesses.

If I want to buy Satisfactory, I can literally only buy it from the Epic Game Store. We can talk about whatever monopolistic practices other retail industries have, but they have nothing on what the gaming industry has accomplished in terms of "exclusive products."

All of which is to say, people have gotten more uncomfortable about Amazon over the last few years, but even talking about base optics, Epic's businesses tactics are even less appealing to consumers than Amazon's. If Epic would have even matched what Amazon did to Diapers.com, for better or worse, they probably wouldn't have gotten half the push-back that they got. If they had implemented say, some form of a loyalty program, genuinely better prices for consumers, had their games on a well-designed and usable storefront, and not had products be exclusively sold by them...then suddenly they look a lot less threatening. They might still functionally be as threatening as they are now, but they wouldn't look that way and therefore probably wouldn't have pissed off so many people.

Part of the EGS pushback is really down to the optics of how a megacorp is wielding their money. Most corps do it with a defter touch, so consumers either don't notice or don't notice until it's too late (say Amazon in 2005 vs Amazon in 2019). Epic's great misstep was being so brazen about their waving their money around like it was part of some kind of phallic measurement contest.

Also, the whole thing about "not innovating or making a better product" is kind of silly. Amazon won its share of the e-commerce market, for better or worse, by largely pioneering the one-stop-internet-shop. Epic, again for better or worse, created its money from designing a useful game development tool set and creating a "better" Battle Royale, if not somehow creating the first actually good one.
 
Last edited:

gabbo

MetaMember
Dec 22, 2018
740
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Going against the prevailing sentiment here, I think this Tweet thread actually misses the mark in a lot of ways. A lot of that is me being pedantic, but still.

The stuff about fears of devaluation and why the discounts are being pulled is absolutely spot on in my opinion. And Steam making sales opt-in is important, especially in the examples given, where a game either has just come out or is about to come out. I remember a game I wanted last Steam sale had come out of Early Access (I think it was Parkitect) right before the sale, but the developer didn't put it on sale, because they were worried about permanently devaluing their brand new game.

The rest of this thread is fairly questionable to me though. The thesis seems to partially be that "Gamers don't know how to articulate what they dislike about Epic, but really it's actually capitalism."

Which I suppose is probably true for some of us, but I really do not believe that's the issue that the overarching "angry PC gamer" has.

And the Amazon and Diapers.com example is an interesting one to bring up, because as far as I remember, consumers didn't generally care about the price war. And I've talked about this before, but the reason comes down to the differences between traditional retail (even "traditional" e-commerce/retail) and the entertainment industry.

If Amazon starts a price war with another retail front like Diapers.com, what happens to the consumer and how can they react?
  • At a very surface level, whether the discounts are ill-gotten/illegal/dubious or not, consumers see diaper prices going down.
  • The retail fronts often begin offering competing benefits or loyalty programs. In the case of the famed Diapers.com incident, Diapers.com was offering great shipping deals. So Amazon started offering special free (emphasis on free) discounts for families through a program called "Amazon Mom" that gave members two-day shipping on diapers/baby wipes, 20% off those products and occasional special discounts.
  • Note real quick that all of this was happening on Amazon's storefront, which was already popular, fairly well-designed and usable.
  • Now, was this freebie permanent? Obviously not, duh. It was largely a Trojan horse to get people into Amazon Prime, which I recall they started offering to parents for free 3-month trials at the time. It was also a way to get people into their grocery subscription services. Now the Amazon Mom benefits still exist, but they've been rolled into both Amazon Prime and give subscription requirements (i.e., you have to be part of Amazon Prime and have 5 baby product subscriptions to get the discounts).
  • For many people though, given that there are supposedly 100 million people in the USA alone with access to Amazon Prime, that still might be a worthwhile deal. You buy a monthly subscription for diapers, baby wipes, toilet paper, detergent, and one type of baby food, and boom you're qualified for the 15-20% discount, in addition to your other (seemingly) customer-friendly Amazon Prime benefits.
And here's the absolute kicker: If I don't want to buy my diapers from Amazon after they bulled Diapers.com, I can probably buy them from a dozen other places. In the USA, there are eight national supermarket chains (including Costco, Walmart, Target, Kroger owned stores, Ahold Delhaize, and Albertsons), as well as any number of local chains like Mitsuwa, Hy-Vee, Raley's, etc, and any local family small businesses.

If I want to buy Satisfactory, I can literally only buy it from the Epic Game Store. We can talk about whatever monopolistic practices other retail industries have, but they have nothing on what the gaming industry has accomplished in terms of "exclusive products."

All of which is to say, people have gotten more uncomfortable about Amazon over the last few years, but even talking about base optics, Epic's businesses tactics are even less appealing to consumers than Amazon's. If Epic would have even matched what Amazon did to Diapers.com, for better or worse, they probably wouldn't have gotten half the push-back that they got. If they had implemented say, some form of a loyalty program, genuinely better prices for consumers, had their games on a well-designed and usable storefront, and not had products be exclusively sold by them...then suddenly they look a lot less threatening. They might still functionally be as threatening as they are now, but they wouldn't look that way and therefore probably wouldn't have pissed off so many people.

Part of the EGS pushback is really down to the optics of how a megacorp is wielding their money. Most corps do it with a defter touch, so consumers either don't notice or don't notice until it's too late (say Amazon in 2005 vs Amazon in 2019). Epic's great misstep was being so brazen about their waving their money around like it was part of some kind of phallic measurement contest.

Also, the whole thing about "not innovating or making a better product" is kind of silly. Amazon won its share of the e-commerce market, for better or worse, by largely pioneering the one-stop-internet-shop. Epic, again for better or worse, created its money from designing a useful game development tool set and creating a "better" Battle Royale, if not somehow creating the first actually good one.
It really does come down to the "how to boil a frog" metaphor. In your example, Amazon slowly turned up the water temperature (as shitty a company as they are). Epic put the frog in a pot of water and tried to heat it with a hand grenade. The desired outcome is the same, but one is clearly going to get better results for the cooks.
Not to even touch on your truth about how scummy we've allowed exclusivity to be in gaming.
 

Arsene

Unpaid Weeb Game Shill
Apr 17, 2019
1,094
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Canada
Going against the prevailing sentiment here, I think this Tweet thread actually misses the mark in a lot of ways. A lot of that is me being pedantic, but still.

The stuff about fears of devaluation and why the discounts are being pulled is absolutely spot on in my opinion. And Steam making sales opt-in is important, especially in the examples given, where a game either has just come out or is about to come out. I remember a game I wanted last Steam sale had come out of Early Access (I think it was Parkitect) right before the sale, but the developer didn't put it on sale, because they were worried about permanently devaluing their brand new game.

The rest of this thread is fairly questionable to me though. The thesis seems to partially be that "Gamers don't know how to articulate what they dislike about Epic, but really it's actually capitalism."

Which I suppose is probably true for some of us, but I really do not believe that's the issue that the overarching "angry PC gamer" has.

And the Amazon and Diapers.com example is an interesting one to bring up, because as far as I remember, consumers didn't generally care about the price war. And I've talked about this before, but the reason comes down to the differences between traditional retail (even "traditional" e-commerce/retail) and the entertainment industry.

If Amazon starts a price war with another retail front like Diapers.com, what happens to the consumer and how can they react?
  • At a very surface level, whether the discounts are ill-gotten/illegal/dubious or not, consumers see diaper prices going down.
  • The retail fronts often begin offering competing benefits or loyalty programs. In the case of the famed Diapers.com incident, Diapers.com was offering great shipping deals. So Amazon started offering special free (emphasis on free) discounts for families through a program called "Amazon Mom" that gave members two-day shipping on diapers/baby wipes, 20% off those products and occasional special discounts.
  • Note real quick that all of this was happening on Amazon's storefront, which was already popular, fairly well-designed and usable.
  • Now, was this freebie permanent? Obviously not, duh. It was largely a Trojan horse to get people into Amazon Prime, which I recall they started offering to parents for free 3-month trials at the time. It was also a way to get people into their grocery subscription services. Now the Amazon Mom benefits still exist, but they've been rolled into both Amazon Prime and give subscription requirements (i.e., you have to be part of Amazon Prime and have 5 baby product subscriptions to get the discounts).
  • For many people though, given that there are supposedly 100 million people in the USA alone with access to Amazon Prime, that still might be a worthwhile deal. You buy a monthly subscription for diapers, baby wipes, toilet paper, detergent, and one type of baby food, and boom you're qualified for the 15-20% discount, in addition to your other (seemingly) customer-friendly Amazon Prime benefits.
And here's the absolute kicker: If I don't want to buy my diapers from Amazon after they bulled Diapers.com, I can probably buy them from a dozen other places. In the USA, there are eight national supermarket chains (including Costco, Walmart, Target, Kroger owned stores, Ahold Delhaize, and Albertsons), as well as any number of local chains like Mitsuwa, Hy-Vee, Raley's, etc, and any local family small businesses.

If I want to buy Satisfactory, I can literally only buy it from the Epic Game Store. We can talk about whatever monopolistic practices other retail industries have, but they have nothing on what the gaming industry has accomplished in terms of "exclusive products."

All of which is to say, people have gotten more uncomfortable about Amazon over the last few years, but even talking about base optics, Epic's businesses tactics are even less appealing to consumers than Amazon's. If Epic would have even matched what Amazon did to Diapers.com, for better or worse, they probably wouldn't have gotten half the push-back that they got. If they had implemented say, some form of a loyalty program, genuinely better prices for consumers, had their games on a well-designed and usable storefront, and not had products be exclusively sold by them...then suddenly they look a lot less threatening. They might still functionally be as threatening as they are now, but they wouldn't look that way and therefore probably wouldn't have pissed off so many people.

Part of the EGS pushback is really down to the optics of how a megacorp is wielding their money. Most corps do it with a defter touch, so consumers either don't notice or don't notice until it's too late (say Amazon in 2005 vs Amazon in 2019). Epic's great misstep was being so brazen about their waving their money around like it was part of some kind of phallic measurement contest.

Also, the whole thing about "not innovating or making a better product" is kind of silly. Amazon won its share of the e-commerce market, for better or worse, by largely pioneering the one-stop-internet-shop. Epic, again for better or worse, created its money from designing a useful game development tool set and creating a "better" Battle Royale, if not somehow creating the first actually good one.
This is a really great write up and I definitely agree with a lot of your points but god I can't stop laughing at the constant reminder that diapers.com was a real legit website, it sounds like something you'd see in a corny B movie.

i know i'm an immature baby please dont attack me
 

texhnolyze

Role Player
Oct 19, 2018
814
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Just saw this in Era, can anyone else confirm?
lol, Darksiders 3 and Metro: Exodus no longer have regional pricing for me. 60$ and 58$ respectively now. I wonder if this is just for the duration of the sale? Either way, it costs more with the discount than it used to without it. EDIT: Ashen's now 40$ too, it used to be 20-something.
The regional prices are still intact on my end, for now...?

(Ashen never receive regional pricing for me, by the way.)
 

ISee

loves cookies
Mar 1, 2019
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Hey there is a sale. Let's ignore the real, big problem: Third party exclusives and let's call out anybody that is still protesting Epic.
#$10 fixed the bigger problem.
 
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Ge0force

Collector of hidden agendas
Jan 12, 2019
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Hey there is a sale. Let's ignore the real, big problem: Third party exclusives and let's call out anybody that is still protesting Epic.
#$10 fixed the bigger problem.
That was exactly my point. What Epic is doing is "we know that pc gamers hate store exclusivity deals, so let's give them $10 to accept it anyway". Perhaps I shouldn't have used the word "bribe", but it does feel like that to me. Am I exaggerating?
 
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NeuralProxy

years to burn
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387
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Italy
That was exactly my point. What Epic is doing is "we know that pc gamers hate store exclusivity deals, so let's give them $10 to accept it anyway". Perhaps I shouldn't have used the word "bribe", but it does feel like that to me.
Yes that's exactly what they're doing: luring customers to their platform not by offering a better service but through a muscle-flexing show-off because they have enough money to do so. Accepting this deal (or bribe, to quote you) today may make their position as a store stronger and make them invest even more on securing exclusives, which ultimately might lead to worse deals and prices for everyone when they'll be the only store selling many titles and people will have accepted the idea of using their launcher by then.

Scrolling through the replies to that stupid tweet, it's frankly disheartening to see so many people who deem themselves on the progressive side of things, fail to see such an obvious thing, which is as old as capitalism.

It's also even more disheartening to see the same people having no problem jumping on yet another twitter mob train over a completely out-of-context post by a complete stranger who they know nothing about. It's bad enough when it's done by the shitty side, it's even worse when it's done by the side who should be more considerate and human. But I guess I should be used to that by now.

Anyway, look at all those likes and retweets! You're famous now!

I knew this guy before he was famous!!!
 

Monooboe

Vagabond Perv Photographer
Oct 10, 2018
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Look, I've been dogpiled on Twitter as well! :giggle:


Should have picked my words better I guess,..

I don't exactly understand ZhugeEx' comparison with Walmart tho. He's probably joking, but isn't Walmart known for driving out small businesses?
"This gamer is so angry" haha so obviously trying to win some points somewhere.
 

ISee

loves cookies
Mar 1, 2019
480
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That was exactly my point. What Epic is doing is "we know that pc gamers hate store exclusivity deals, so let's give them $10 to accept it anyway". Perhaps I shouldn't have used the word "bribe", but it does feel like that to me. Am I exaggerating?
I know, I deleted my account out of protest too and got some flag for it.
I said I was willing to use the EGS, once they stop taking games hostage and then deleted my account. I never spoke out against cheaper prices or costumer discounts. People willingly ignored that comment though, called it an embarrassing move, me anti consumer and stupid.
The real reason why people protest the EGS got lost in the "I can get a game for $10 less" excitement and people quickly turned against any form of critique because they would have had to accept that they were taking $10 "bribes" otherwise.

And to be fair: People are free to buy games from where ever and for any reason they see fit. Free market, free rules, nothing is against the law here.
$10 are good enough of a reason to support and help build a potential, future monopoly.
Not really shocking: Most people don't buy faire trade coffee, don't care about the conditions their clothes were manufactured under, don't care what happens with their old electronic devices and how they are being recycled. Much bigger problems are being ignored, daily. Some people don't know better, most just don't make enough money to have "high" standards in the first place. I'm not better and I don't blame people for taking the $10 bribe.
I just wish they would stop spinning everything, ignore reasons and comments, play ignorant and attack critiques. You aren't rich, so take the money. I get it. Just stay honest: EGS is still a terrible, anti consumer company and what they are doing is shit.

I hate Epic though, this move is so foreseeable, nothing clever here. It's the gaming store equivalent of Marie Antoinette's "Let them eat cake". I know it's a myth, but it describes the feeling the sale invoked in me: Rich people thinking they are clever, while in truth being dislocated from reality. sigh
 
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Ge0force

Collector of hidden agendas
Jan 12, 2019
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Belgium
Yes that's exactly what they're doing: luring customers to their platform not by offering a better service but through a muscle-flexing show-off because they have enough money to do so. Accepting this deal (or bribe, to quote you) today may make their position as a store stronger and make them invest even more on securing exclusives, which ultimately might lead to worse deals and prices for everyone when they'll be the only store selling many titles and people will have accepted the idea of using their launcher by then.

Scrolling through the replies to that stupid tweet, it's frankly disheartening to see so many people who deem themselves on the progressive side of things, fail to see such an obvious thing, which is as old as capitalism.

It's also even more disheartening to see the same people having no problem jumping on yet another twitter mob train over a completely out-of-context post by a complete stranger who they know nothing about. It's bad enough when it's done by the shitty side, it's even worse when it's done by the side who should be more considerate and human. But I guess I should be used to that by now.

Anyway, look at all those likes and retweets! You're famous now!

I knew this guy before he was famous!!!
Your post perfectly describes how I feel about this whole situation as well. At least I'm not the ONLY one with this opinion :giggle:

Oh and let me know if you want an autograph :cool:


"This gamer is so angry" haha so obviously trying to win some points somewhere.
I don't even know who that guy is, but he seems to have lots of followers.

Best reply on that Tweet is some guy claiming that I'm obsessed with Nvidia. I guess he hasn't seen my new avatar yet :LOL:
 

MJunioR

Signed an exclusivity deal with MetaCouncil
Mar 13, 2019
689
1,441
93
Look, I've been dogpiled on Twitter as well! :giggle:


Should have picked my words better I guess,..

I don't exactly understand ZhugeEx' comparison with Walmart tho. He's probably joking, but isn't Walmart known for driving out small businesses?
GCJ people can be very annoying, don't worry.
 

RionaaM

Vogon Poetry Appreciator
Sep 6, 2018
596
1,409
93
Epic sent me an (probably automated) Email, asking about my Account Deletion Experience. Standard Costumer Support stuff (I assume), but if they want my Feedback, well here it is.




They aren't destroying PC gaming, but they are making it worse.
This is bullshit. You asked to be completely removed from their system, and yet they kept your email address and are contacting you for feedback. Fuck you Epic, which part of "Erase me the hell out of your platform" you don't understand?
 

ISee

loves cookies
Mar 1, 2019
480
921
93
This is bullshit. You asked to be completely removed from their system, and yet they kept your email address and are contacting you for feedback. Fuck you Epic, which part of "Erase me the hell out of your platform" you don't understand?
You aren't wrong, but to be fair they say that removing all data will take about 2 weeks.