Community Book club - What are you reading and what have you read recently

Ascheroth

Chilling in the Megastructure
Nov 12, 2018
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Which reminds me, I wanted to share my thoughts on different amateur and webnovels I read, but I don't know if I should do it in this thread or make a new one.
I don't really know what's the best place to put it, but I'm looking forward to it!
I also have a bunch of thoughts on webnovels as well.
 
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Li Kao

It’s a strange world. Let’s keep it that way.
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I'm all hears :cuteblob:

What website did you say you visit for you chinese novels Ascheroth ?
 

Kyougar

No reviews, no Buy
Nov 2, 2018
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I made the thread:
 

Swenhir

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Apr 18, 2019
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I am currently reading His Majesty's Dragon and damn this is good so far!

Discworld is probably next in line :).
 

Kyougar

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had to drop the Webnovel "Metaworld Chronicles" today. Couldn't continue after 111 chapters (out of currently 362). When your 30-year-old successful Businesswoman SI in a 16-year-old body in a magical world, constantly acts like she is 12, even I get fed up with it.

Well, let's see what the "SI get's reincarnated as an Ant" story is all about. (Chrysalis)
 

Li Kao

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The recent Hugo award drama has led me to look into those things and, are there awards for weird fiction ? or for supernatural, modern setting works ? Mmh yeah, I guess I could look into the Bram Stoker, but isn't it really focused on horror ?
It's what I hate about the big awards, too focused on a genre. Hugo, everything was sci-fi, another one, everything was fantasy, where is my weird award where the tropes are not set in stone ?



Yesterday, I read The Hell Screen by Ryūnosuke Akutagawa, with great difficulties. Reading in English, so not in my mother's tongue, and a Japanese short story at that, with very Japanese terms, was painful sometimes. Haunting. Not particularly supernatural or whatever, but haunting. A lot of 'unsaid', and there is room to find multiple meanings behind some events.
The use of the sorta unreliable narrator is perfect.
 
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Li Kao

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'Unseen - Unfeared' by Francis Stevens
OCD block while reading 4/5

Anecdotal, or maybe not, because the author writes kind of a Lovecraftian story before Lovecraft (haven't checked the dates). I'm a little caricaturing, as it's more psychology than cosmic horror, but some elements are similar in practice.
Still, the intrigue is a little messy, confusing, and yeah, quite forgettable. Good imagery when shit hits the fan, though.

2/5



Let's go back and try this format again :

'The Hell Screen'
by Ryūnosuke Akutagawa
OCD block while reading 2/5

Haunting. More grounded than fantastical. The author's skill is evident, unreliable narrator, characters that go from seemingly good to evil and vice versa, multiple meanings to be found, it's perfect. And while I thought the weird fiction part was difficult to find at first, it's quite apparent in the fact that the reader is never on solid ground.

5/5
 
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Li Kao

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'In the Penal Colony' by Franz Kafka
OCD block while reading 4/5

I fear my 40 year old brain and the years that separate me from school make that I cannot really judge the story. Because it's rich, it has layers, I feel some philosophy knowledge (recent, not 20 years old) wouldn't be bad either.
It was hard to read for my OCD brain, it was not written in a style I loved, it was a little boring. And yet one can't dismiss the qualities of the text. I lacked the necessary keys to savor it fully.
That being said, it's not without some more immediate and simpler pleasures, the weird part is there all right and there is some super suprising attempts at humor in tragedy (maybe some absurd at play ?). But there is so much to unpack, I feel like I just scratched the surface.

2/5 that could very well be 4/5


'The White Wyrak' by Stefan Grabinski
OCD block while reading 1/5

Interesting, I had just heard of Grabinski a few days ago for the first time and here he is. The Polish Poe / Lovecraft, but with a take on horror that is found in modernity, in the industrial revolution tools. As someone relatively fascinated by cities, how they are born, how they work, the interaction of untold number of people, this is right up my alley.
Unfortunately if the start is intriguing and creepy, as soon as you encounter the source of the problem, I feel a lot of the promising potential vanish, turning the story into a banal monster one, and ends quite shortly after.
I will read more stories from Grabinski, though.

2/5


'The Night Wire' by H.F. Arnold
OCD block while reading 1/5

One of the most famous stories from early weird tales, or some other pulp mag, not sure I'm remembering the name correctly.
The starting sentences are super powerful, describing the bleak, the madness that is the world of an employee at the night wire in early 20th century. Again with the modern horror, interesting.
Weird, check, creepy, check. But short, too short to develop anything other than your typical shock ending, not on the level of the premise.

3/5
 
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Swenhir

Spaceships!
Apr 18, 2019
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I don't have much to add to this thread but I do enjoying reading it and your recommendations avidly! I have in particular made a list of those web novels that I'll get to after I'm done with my current series

His Majesty's Dragon is really, really nice to read. I was scared of it being a little cynical and much too brutal but instead it's something between how to train your dragon and Master and Commander. I recommend it so far if you like dragons :).
 

BlueOdin

Green
Dec 3, 2018
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Dschörmähnie
Currently reading The Destiny/Fate of the Dwarves by Markus Heitz. Similar to the other books in the series I like it but I try so hard to love it because so many around me do. But it just doesn't want to work. It's not even bad or anything. Just something about the tone doesn't sit right with me.
 
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Li Kao

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'The Book' by Margaret Irwin
OCD block while reading 2/5

A man finds a strange book in his bookcase.
Hilarity ensues :so-good-blob:
-
Extremely formulaic, the story feels like it goes into some very dark corners just for shock value, nothing but a cheap thrill.

1/5


'The Mainz Psalter'
by Jean Ray
OCD block while reading 2/5

The captain of a ship is hired by a schoolmaster to sail toward a mysterious destination.
-
Now that's interesting, there's potential here. I never read Ray and it's clearly a mistake. Definite Lovecraft vibes, creepy mood, it was great. Until I stumbled on my maritime English skill, things went a little too fast and a little nowhere.
On a side note, I saw the author going somewhere a mile away with a plot point
terrified man at the start
and... he didn't. But, at the risk of being presumptuous, he should have.

At the end of the day, not perfect but a good read that makes me curious to read more Jean Ray.

3/5

Next in line - The Shadowy Street by Jean Ray
 

Li Kao

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'The Shadowy Street' by Jean Ray
OCD block while reading 3/5

The narrator finds two diaries in a pile of old papers on a dock. Two separate stories that complement each other.
-
I'm a little annoyed with this one. Each story is good, there is ample weird bits, to the point of being an obvious inspiration for authors like China Mieville for example, it can be creepy... but I have a hard time viewing this as a complete package, the link between the two stories is obvious but it's so weird that my mind has a hard time with it. Maybe because the nature and motivation of the menace remains too vague imho, but at the same time this keeps with the weird vibe.

4/5

Next in line - Was tired of short stories so I headed head on into 'The Monster of Elendhaven' by Jennifer Giesbrecht (80 pages or less, novella ? novelette ?).
Prognosis isn't good, my reading OCD is on overdrive at 5/5 and I'm not too hot on the story. Surprisingly, or not, I didn't consciously choose it for that, but it's also quite weird.
 
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Linkark07

IDKFA
Apr 18, 2019
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The Portrait of Dorian Gray.

Read this when I was younger, but since it is the book of this month's meeting in my literary group, read it again. Overall, liked it, although it was quite short. Perhaps with more pages, it could have been better.

3/5.

Now reading Ascendance of a Bookworm Vol1 Part 2. Loved the anime, so now I want to read how Myne's mind works. The first book was quite good introducing us how Urano had to adapt to that world, her new life and her new (sickly) body. Despite knowing what will happen, still looking forward to how the events are portrayed in the books.
 

Li Kao

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Long time no read :face-with-cold-sweat:

That being said, just a little question : what is your go to ebook reader app ?
I'm never satisfied, nothing checks all my boxes. I would be curious to know what's your jam people.
 
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Swenhir

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Long time no read :face-with-cold-sweat:

That being said, just a little question : what is your go to ebook reader app ?
I'm never satisfied, nothing checks all my boxes. I would be curious to know what's your jam people.
I honestly couldn't settle on one. A screen doesn't work for me, and I was really glad to snag a physical reader. If you can, I recommend it. Never read as much as with one.
 
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Milena

Lost in VR
Jan 4, 2019
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Oh god, I haven't updated my finished (audio)books in so long :confounded-face:
I did slow down my listening a bit during the first month of COVID quarantine. Now I pretty much listen as much as before, as the time I would normally use to drive to work, I use for walks.


I really liked Congo, it was fast paced, the way the expedition is presented added some needed tension and there's also a bit of mistery (albeit pretty predictable now), so it made for a very nice listening experience.
Overall, I'd recommend it - 3,5/5


Now this was a nice surprise. I wanted another short book that could be read as a standalone. It is actually the first in a series, but I read that the ending worked on its own so I tried it. I can confirm that it does indeed work on its own, with the kind of open-ending that lets your imagination decide how it could continue (well, unless you read the sequel). Certainly not recommended if you fear spiders, as most of the story is told through the point of view of evolving spiders on a distant planet. The other half of the story follows what remains of Humankind after the events narrated at the beginning of the book.
I love sci-fi and this felt like a fresh and interesting. The narrator in the book was ok, but I had to speed her up, because she read super slowly.
I'd recommend it for sure - 4/5


Second book in the new sci-fi series from Sanderson. What can I say? I love Sanderson. This one takes the story a lot further, but I can't explain much without spoilering the ending of the first book.
The american narrator is the one I chose for this, she does a great job
Well, it's Sanderson - 4,5/5


I waited for the third and last book in the series to come out before starting this one. Well, I devoured them. It had pretty much everything I love from a fantasy book: likeable characters, epic adventures, lost civilizations, a seemingly undeafatable enemy and even time travel.
So great series, I'll certainly look forward to his next books. Also great narrator (one who does a lot of Sanderson stuff as well).
Recommended to any fantasy fan - 5/5


It took me a while to get into the story, pretty much all the first book. It didn't really help that unfortunately this series doesn't have high quality recordings, alrthough the narrator did a great job. Anyway, I liked it more and more as the series progressed, which is something that admittedly happens quite often for me, as I get invested pretty easily if the characters are likeable enough.
The magic system was interesting, as was discovering the different species / civilizations as you follow the protagonist and his friends / family around.
All in all this is a very good series - 4/5


I watch Ellis' videos and most of the times I see that my tastes align with hers, especially regarding first contact sci-fi movies. So I was very interested in this and I can say that it didn't disappoint me. I loved it from start to finish and I hope we'll get more.
I don't know if it was me, maybe I was in a weird state while listening the first part of the book, but the initial contact (or presumed contact) with the alien was pretty scary. It felt like the beginning of E.T. (which still manages to scare me after all these years).
Well done - 4/5
 
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Mivey

MeatMember
Sep 20, 2018
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Long time no read :face-with-cold-sweat:

That being said, just a little question : what is your go to ebook reader app ?
I'm never satisfied, nothing checks all my boxes. I would be curious to know what's your jam people.
The best ereader are physical.
I love my Kobo Aura One.

The screen isn't so perfectly white as shown on this promo image, though with a backlight it's quite nice.

I also like the ereader inside Calibre, if you really want to read on a PC.
 

Swenhir

Spaceships!
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The best ereader are physical.
I love my Kobo Aura One.

The screen isn't so perfectly white as shown on this promo image, though with a backlight it's quite nice.

I also like the ereader inside Calibre, if you really want to read on a PC.
Clara HD here if I recall correctly. About a hundred bucks that I spent while travelling and I never regretted it.
 

Li Kao

It’s a strange world. Let’s keep it that way.
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Hmm, interesting. I never really could 'get' my kindle (my mother loves hers to death though). I suppose it's the eInk thing, I do not find it particularly nice. I suppose you all are talking about modern LCD screens ?

edit - Dayum at those prices, sons :face-with-cold-sweat:
edit 2 - I see that readers still use eInk, but can I hope that the technology has matured and you don't get ghost text when changing pages ?
 
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Li Kao

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The Nameless Offspring by Clark Ashton Smith
A traveler ends up passing the night in the manor of his father's childhood friend. The friend that everyone in the family spoke about with ushed voice. Oops.

Still in the 'Friends of Lovecraft' section. Still a nice story but the already read feeling is definitely there. That said, Ashton Smith is the author that impressed me the most in this part of the book. Maybe no incredible heights, but no lows either. A definite inclination for the macabre.
Anecdotal and very much forgettable, though.
2/5

The Statement of Randolph Carter by HP Lovecraft

Randolph Carter explain, to the best of his ability, what happened during a fateful night in a lost cemetery. And what happened to the friend he was accompanying.

I can imagine people saying 'that's it ?', but in the right mindset, or at least mine while reading, it was very good. Nothing described, just suggested. And the ending line is chilling.
I was not surprised to learn that it was the original material was a dream of Lovecraft, it possesses this 'little thing' nightmares share.
4/5

and finally started the Dreamland Cycle with
Polaris by HP Lovecraft
The narrator keeps having the same dream of inhabiting a strange city of marble.

I should have know I was in shaky territory, reading comprehension-wise. The narration and internal logic is more dream-like all right.
I can appreciate what was there, the world is promising, but yeah, I left wanting more.
2/5
 
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Swenhir

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The Nameless Offspring by Clark Ashton Smith
A traveler ends up passing the night in the manor of his father's childhood friend. The friend that everyone in the family spoke about with ushed voice. Oops.

Still in the 'Friends of Lovecraft' section. Still a nice story but the already read feeling is definitely there. That said, Ashton Smith is the author that impressed me the most in this part of the book. Maybe no incredible heights, but no lows either. A definite inclination for the macabre.
Anecdotal and very much forgettable, though.
2/5

The Statement of Randolph Carter by HP Lovecraft

Randolph Carter explain, to the best of his ability, what happened during a fateful night in a lost cemetery. And what happened to the friend he was accompanying.

I can imagine people saying 'that's it ?', but in the right mindset, or at least mine while reading, it was very good. Nothing described, just suggested. And the ending line is chilling.
I was not surprised to learn that it was the original material was a dream of Lovecraft, it possesses this 'little thing' nightmares share.
4/5

and finally started the Dreamland Cycle with
Polaris by HP Lovecraft
The narrator keeps having the same dream of inhabiting a strange city of marble.

I should have know I was in shaky territory, reading comprehension-wise. The narration and internal logic is more dream-like all right.
I can appreciate what was there, the world is promising, but yeah, I left wanting more.
2/5
You make me want to read Polaris. I had one particularly vivid and captivating nightmare once and I devoured a lot of Lovecraft's work afterwards. This roused my appetite again ^^.
 
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Li Kao

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Worth noting, so as there is no confusion, that Polaris is not horrific at all. More sad, really.
Randolph Carter shock, or let's say unsettling, ending, is more nightmarish.

But yeah, I'm interested in Lovecraft writing about his nightmares, there is something fascinating into turning them into a world. And even more interesting is the fact that other horror writers seem to have adopted this and made their own dreamland. I dream about the same dreamland on the regular too, which is not that surprising, I guess (the unconscious etc.). I have a fuzzy plan of the land in my head, there is the old strange forest with giant animals, the redneck cannibal farm that house a monster in the basement to the south west, the city up north, etc.

I'm in a wait and see position about the land, although to be honest it's a lot more human drama in the city these days. Which is mundane, but far less tiring than the more exotic locations.
 
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Swenhir

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Worth noting, so as there is no confusion, that Polaris is not horrific at all. More sad, really.
Randolph Carter shock, or let's say unsettling, ending, is more nightmarish.

But yeah, I'm interested in Lovecraft writing about his nightmares, there is something fascinating into turning them into a world. And even more interesting is the fact that other horror writers seem to have adopted this and made their own dreamland. I dream about the same dreamland on the regular too, which is not that surprising, I guess (the unconscious etc.). I have a fuzzy plan of the land in my head, there is the old strange forest with giant animals, the redneck cannibal farm that house a monster in the basement to the south west, the city up north, etc.

I'm in a wait and see position about the land, although to be honest it's a lot more human drama in the city these days. Which is mundane, but far less tiring than the more exotic locations.
That's pretty cool! And understood about Polaris, this is a bit disappointing but it makes sense :).

Also, the real horror is noise in an apartment building. Great Old Ones have nothing over a hammering you can't pinpoint because concrete transmits noise faster than gossip through a village.
 
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Li Kao

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Yesterday was a letdown.

The White Ship by HP Lovecraft
A lighthouse guardian accept the invitation to come aboard a white ship, in a journey that will lead him far from our reality.

Not bad, the dreamlike world building is nice, but the whole thing, imho, is marred by a very very crude and used moral. Beware of what you wish for, or maybe take care that inquisitiveness could lead to your undoing. Yeah, ok :confused-face:

3/5


The Doom that came to Sarnath by HP Lovecraft

Of the massacre of the people of the Ancient City of Ib by the warriors of glorious Sarnath, and their revenge.

I don't know why it didn't work with me. Maybe I was just unable to take the physical description of the people of Ib seriously. It's a nice story, with bronze age vibes, totally not unpleasant to read. But, yeah, for me it's... there.
Worth noting is that after checking the wikipedia page, my old French translation seem to be sketchy. Not wrong, but inaccurate on some details.

2/5


The Tree by HP Lovecraft

The tale of what befell the two most brilliant sculptors of their times.

At face value, the story was an undecipherable mess to me. Then a little googling took me to a Tor.com page where a reading of it was extracted that made sense. But then it become so mundane, so ghostly revenge 101 that, meh.

1/5



I will note, for the sake of it, that my big book must have been organized by a drunk monkey. The Tree have shit all to do with the dream cycle, and while Sarnath is listed as being part of it on wikipedia, it seems more about the pre-history of man than the dreamlands, if we go by the references to it in other shorts.
 

Swenhir

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Yesterday was a letdown.

The White Ship by HP Lovecraft
A lighthouse guardian accept the invitation to come aboard a white ship, in a journey that will lead him far from our reality.

Not bad, the dreamlike world building is nice, but the whole thing, imho, is marred by a very very crude and used moral. Beware of what you wish for, or maybe take care that inquisitiveness could lead to your undoing. Yeah, ok :confused-face:

3/5


The Doom that came to Sarnath by HP Lovecraft

Of the massacre of the people of the Ancient City of Ib by the warriors of glorious Sarnath, and their revenge.

I don't know why it didn't work with me. Maybe I was just unable to take the physical description of the people of Ib seriously. It's a nice story, with bronze age vibes, totally not unpleasant to read. But, yeah, for me it's... there.
Worth noting is that after checking the wikipedia page, my old French translation seem to be sketchy. Not wrong, but inaccurate on some details.

2/5


The Tree by HP Lovecraft

The tale of what befell the two most brilliant sculptors of their times.

At face value, the story was an undecipherable mess to me. Then a little googling took me to a Tor.com page where a reading of it was extracted that made sense. But then it become so mundane, so ghostly revenge 101 that, meh.

1/5



I will note, for the sake of it, that my big book must have been organized by a drunk monkey. The Tree have shit all to do with the dream cycle, and while Sarnath is listed as being part of it on wikipedia, it seems more about the pre-history of man than the dreamlands, if we go by the references to it in other shorts.
Those reviews are all really neat, thank you.

To add to this thread, I actually finished His Majesty's Dragon and it was such a good read that I'm now deep into the Throne of Jade and loving it. It's got a bit of that strange feeling of being a book unlike the one prior. For some reason, it reminds me of Honor Harrington's merchantman episode.

Naomi Novik is achieving in these books some of the most powerful worldbuilding I've seen in a historical setting and it rouses this fire, this desire to explore and see incredible things. I look forward to reading so much more of her work :).
 
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Li Kao

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First post of the day -
Yesterday I bought... real books :fearful-face:
A French publisher has been releasing a line of short stories ? novellas ? novelettes ?, each one in the science fiction or supernatural genre. I was interested in their latest release until I learned that due to the literary agent of the author demanding DRM and the French publisher being sane and not doing it, there wouldn't be an ebook version of this release.
And as they have their annual promotion where if you buy two books of this line, you receive a special issue that won't be published, just for the fans...

Here I am waiting for (all thematic similarities with what I am reading purely fortuitous, obviously :face-with-cold-sweat: )

Agents of Dreamland by Caitlin R. KIERNAN (2017)
The Ballad of Black Tom, by Victor Lavalle (2016)
Special issue containing The Horse Raiders by Kij Johnson (2020)

IFFFFFFF reading real books again goes well, I won't forget to add those to my reading list

The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe by Kij Johnson (2016)
The Man Who Bridged the Mist by Kij Johnson (2011) [already have it]
Fox Magic by Kij Johnson (1993)
 
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Li Kao

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In other news I read -

The Cats of Ulthar (1920)
About the origin of the law forbidding the killing of cats in the city of Ulthar.
Good. A little limited in scope, but a good read. Maybe unfortunate that you can see the twist coming a mile away, but no big deal 3/5

The Other Gods (1921)

About what happened to the wise man from Ulthar who ascended the great mountain of Hatheg-Kla to meet the Gods.
Now this on the other hand was pretty boring. Most of the story focus on the travel, and a little Mythos aftertaste excepted, it was uninteresting 1/5

Celephaïs (1920)

About a disenfranchised dreamer's quest to get back to Celephaïs, the dream city of his youth.
Boring too, but the ending is solid and there are some beautiful, mental images to be had (the knights in shining armors, etc.) 3/5

The Quest of Iranon (1921)

About Iranon the poet and his uncountable travels to find the city of his youth, Aira, and his love of beauty.
Similar summary to Celephaïs, because, eh, similar core idea, but different enough in execution. More mythological, more dreamlike in its internal logic too. More difficult to fully grasp, maybe because I'm dumb. A better story overall 3/5


I would be dishonest if I didn't say that the dream cycle is what I expected or if I said I wasn't often bored while reading. But it's maybe an expectation issue from me. Coming from Cthulhu, I thought there would be traces of Lovecaft typical 'anguish'. But it's far more akin to the work of Lord Dunsany. Extremely similar and that's no surprise as Lovecraft was a fan IIRC. Onirism and myth-like storytelling are the focus, not angst.
And while I strangely liked The Gods of Pegāna by Dunsany, this is far less tedious and more approachable to modern readers.
 
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Li Kao

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When I see how much you read, I'm reminded of what I used to do. Depression is a beast. I'm still amazed, thanks for all the reviews!
I'm afraid I must be clear on the fact that I'm just reviewing small short stories here, my friend. Depression and reading OCD all but killed my reading endurance. And to think I was the type to declare that the longer a book is, the better.
Now I'm reading shorts that last a bunch of pages :confused-face:
 
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Swenhir

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I'm afraid I must be clear on the fact that I'm just reviewing small short stories here, my friend. Depression and reading OCD all but killed my reading endurance. And to think I was the type to declare that the longer a book is, the better.
Now I'm reading shorts that last a bunch of pages :confused-face:
I'm kind of the same. Trying to read a little at a time, but it's still very rewarding. Anxiety is just not very focus-friendly.

I hope things get better :).
 
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Li Kao

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Hey, Meta, while trying to sleep I was thinking (because for fuck sake my mind could give it a rest sometimes but noooo...).
Can you recommend books where the city is as entrancing as Salem by Stephen King. I can throw a lot of shade at his main plotline, but the city was the star of the book for me. Evil under each rock, secrets, interesting snapshots into its inhabitants lives. So good. The city stole the show by a mile.
 
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Mivey

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Finished this one a while ago



It's now the 8th novel in the Rivers of London series. After the fairly dramatic last novel, Lies Sleeping, this one feels like a much more relaxed adventure. Peter had to spent some time suspended from his police duties (for reasons that are fairly spoilery), but is slowly coming back into the game. This time the series takes on the promise of AI, or rather General AI. So a real, functioning intelligence, so full HAL 9000. And as expected, things go very wrong, very quickly.
I love especially how this book is actually expanding the setting, with some hints of a magical order situated within the New York Public Library, keeping order. Of course, they set foot in London without understanding that someone else is keeping the peace there.

Overall, the series continues to be nice comfort food, showing a magical, and very culturally diverse side of London. Basically every character is from some sort of racial minority, and of course Peters background and race are an always present part of the story, though more in how he is treated by others, than anything that makes himself directly stand out.

Recommend this series to anyone who'd wants a sort of Hogwarts meets police serial, except no bigoted author to worry about, and the story being very openly liberal.
 
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Panda Pedinte

Banned
Sep 20, 2018
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I can't believe I forgot to update the books I've read since last year :notlikethisblob: so a quick update.

I finished reading Dune, and also the other 3 sequels and I can say that really enjoyed Children of Dune and God Emperor of Dune:



Also got around reading 3 Old Man's War book: Old Man's War. The Ghost Brigades and The Last Colony

It's an easy read for people who like science fiction.



There were other books that I've read in that time but I'm too lazy to look for them right now.
 

Li Kao

It’s a strange world. Let’s keep it that way.
Jan 28, 2019
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Ok, I think that I have a horror burnout. Which is annoying because I generally live and breath horror litterary-wise. But my long series of Lovecraft readings that ended yesterday with Red Hook tired me. I need other genres !
I don't like other genres ! :anguished-face:

Contemplating trying Dune but my last SF attempt ended in a wet fart. And damn those real books are too big for me, the risk of dropping them is huge compared to a short story.

Any advice, any genre ? I'm in a pickle.
 

Li Kao

It’s a strange world. Let’s keep it that way.
Jan 28, 2019
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Are there good Warhammer 40k books for a neophyte of the franchise (in book form) ?
 

Li Kao

It’s a strange world. Let’s keep it that way.
Jan 28, 2019
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Reddit says
  1. Horus Heresy (definitely the defining lore)
  2. Gaunts Ghosts (imo the best series in the warhammer line)
  3. Commissar Cain (witty sense of humor, up to like 6 books in the series now)
  4. Eisenhorn (A 3 part series on the Inquisition, my personal favorite, and one of the defining series of the early line of Black Library books)
Though there are a lot of diverging opinions on the order. I would start with Eisenhorn since it apparently does a good job at portraying the universe.
Who am I kidding, I have spent the last two days adding books to the pile, and not reading them.
 
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ZKenir

❀ Child of Raikou ❀
May 10, 2019
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I started with the Space Wolves omnibus, then read the books of the Horus Heresy in chronological order until Fulgrim (which is honestly not that far into it) just to get a peak at uncorrupted Horus and some other legions early days.
After that I read the Blood Angel omibus, Soul Drinkers omnibus, Dark Angels omnibus, Salamanders omnibus and Ultramarines omnibus and am currently thinking of going back to the Horus Heresy and also reading the Cain and Eisenhorn stuff

I feel like any omnibus is a good starting point as it gives a decent idea of the universe, I wouldn't start with the Dark Angels though.

edit: and yeah i'm biased towards space marines
 
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Li Kao

It’s a strange world. Let’s keep it that way.
Jan 28, 2019
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Started 'Carrie' on a whim. Well, not totally unexpected since I just watched a (mediocre) documentary on King.
...
This is not a funny read :sweaty-blob:

It's as boring as it is heartbreaking. We will see, not uninteresting, King has a way with creating 'breathing' characters, but yeah, hard to read and even without having seen the movie, it seems that anyone at least mildly interested in the horror genre won't be surprised.
But dayuummm.


After that we will see. I may read 'Dead Zone' (yeah, I'm reading through King in broad chronological order, at least for now), or some weird Russian litt like...



'Vita Nostra'
by Marina and Sergei Dyachenko
Sort of Harry Potter at the gulag... Wait, wut ?




'The Organization'
by Maria Galina
A Russian Ghostbusters... Come Again ?

In the interest of precision these comparisons were just some buzz words I saw, and I fully expect for them to be grossly erroneous and the books to be much weirder and super boring. Still, interest piqued.
 
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